Crime XXXXVI – Constructive Manslaughter V – The Unlawful Act IV

In order to establish constructive manslaughter, it suffices that the act is unlawful or prohibited by law and the act need not be necessarily directed at the victim, in fact the unlawful act need not even be directed at a person for example when the accused throws stones through a shop window with intent to cause criminal damage.

S1. 1 of The Criminal Damage Act 1971 defines criminal damage. The section reads as follows: –

(1) A person who without lawful excuse destroys or damages any property belonging to another intending to destroy or damage any such property or being reckless as to whether any such property would be destroyed or damaged shall be guilty of an offence.

(2) A person who without lawful excuse destroys or damages any property, whether belonging to himself or another—

(a) intending to destroy or damage any property or being reckless as to whether any property would be destroyed or damaged; and

(b) intending by the destruction or damage to endanger the life of another or being reckless as to whether the life of another would be thereby endangered;

shall be guilty of an offence.

(3) An offence committed under this section by destroying or damaging property by fire shall be charged as arson.

In R v Larkin (1942) the accused was brandishing a razor intending to frighten his mistress’s lover in the presence of his mistress. His mistress, who was drunk at the time, stumbled while the accused was brandishing the razor and her throat was cut. The woman died as a result. The accused was tried and convicted for constructive manslaughter and the defense appealed.

It was held that the fact that there was an assault directed at his mistress’s lover i.e. to put him in fear of his life, was an unlawful act and it was sufficient to establish constructive manslaughter. The act need not be directed at the victim.

 Copyright © 2018 by Dyarne Ward

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